bmiheader

Subscribers-Archives Access

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

Public Archives Search

Keyword

STOCKS

Market quotes are powered by TradingView.com

Alcohol Issues Insights

While annual Monitoring the Future surveys show remarkable long-term declines in drinking prevalence among junior and senior high school students, the same surveys show some slight increases in drinking among young adults age 19-28, at least over the last decade. At the same time, attitudes about moderate and heavy drinking show some modest changes among this segment of the population. Just below 69% of 19-28 year olds drank monthly in 2008, according to MTF. That's up 2 points from 66.9% in 1998, though still 5 points below the 75% of 19-28 yr olds who drank monthly in the late 80s. Daily drinking among this age group increased from 4% to 5.3% over the last decade, though again that's down from 6.1% 20 years ago. Compare these trends to monthly drinking among 18 yr-olds, which dropped from 63.9% in 1988 to 52% in 98 then 43% in 2008. Similarly, daily drinking among 18 yr-olds declined from 4.2% to 3.9% to 2.8%. What about older adults? MTF data on those 30+ doesn't go as far back as the teen data, but monthly drinking among 35 yr-olds increased from 62.9% in 98 to 65% in 08; among 40 yr-olds the rate increased from…

Publishing Info

  • Year 2010
  • Volume 27
  • Issue # 3
A new House bill introduced by Lucille-Roybal Allard does not mention the Amethyst Initiative to reconsider minimum age 21, but it reads in part like a response to John McCardell and his colleagues. For example, the bill's "Findings" section leads off with the insistence that "The age-21 minimum drinking law

Publishing Info

  • Year 2009
  • Volume 26
  • Issue # 2
"The current US recommendation of one drink per day for an older adult, by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, may be restrictive." That's the provocative conclusion of a recent, detailed review of studies on the health effects of moderate drinking among older adults. "Emerging findings," the authors also point out, suggest that those over 65 "who consumed up to two drinks per day had no greater disability or mortality than those who consumed up to one per drink per day." Not only are these older moderate drinkers at "no greater disability," but older moderate drinkers benefit from a wide array of positive health associations, the authors point out. Among those benefits, detailed in the study and familiar to AII readers: Data from "more than 100 studies across 25 countries consistently demonstrate" an association between moderate alcohol consumption and reduced risk for coronary heart disease. "The relationship holds for mortality." Research suggests "that alcohol/wine can exert protective effects against other diseases such as cancer, diabetes, inflammatory liver disease and lower extremity arterial disease." "Reports of positive effects of alcohol/wine intake on bone density in older women." "There are emerging data to suggest that moderate alcohol intake is associated…

Publishing Info

  • Year 2008
  • Volume 25
  • Issue # 12
Here's yet another study that identified moderate drinking as a key lifestyle factor linked to better health, especially among older people. In fact, moderate drinking was more significant to "thriving" among this population than regular exercise or normal weight. In a first-of-its kind study, US and Canadian researchers followed over 2400 adults in Canada for a 10-year period. The subjects were 65 to 85 years old at the beginning of the survey. Most previous surveys of "healthy aging" measured results at a single point in time. "No other study has used such a follow-up survey with repeated measures to determine the maintenance of exceptionally good health in a large population-based sample of older persons," the authors pointed out. They rated health based on 8 attributes: vision, hearing, speech, ambulation, dexterity, emotion, cognition, and pain/discomfort. Scores could be as high as 1.0 and as low as a negative rating for an "all-worst" state, described as "worse than dead." The participants were placed into 4 groups: "thrivers (who maintained exceptional health with no or only mild disability), non-thrivers (moderate or severe disability)" the deceased and the institutionalized. Only 8% of the adults were considered "thrivers" over the 10 years of the study.…

Publishing Info

  • Year 2008
  • Volume 25
  • Issue # 11
In a quiet but important shift, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is no longer including numbers of "alcohol-related fatalities" - or the phrase itself -- in its Annual Assessments. Instead, the latest report (released August 28) analyzes only "alcohol-impaired driving fatalities," when at least one driver (or motorcycle operator) in the crash has a BAC of .08 or higher. Gone from the data and discussion: statistics on drivers or non-occupants with BACs lower than .08 but higher than zero. For years, industry members and other observers believed the alcohol-related figures distorted the drunk-driving picture. Many suggested NHTSA should focus on high-risk, high-BAC drivers. It would appear NHTSA changed its view. Note too: NHTSA's current prevention message is not focused on zero tolerance (the 2005 message was "You Drink & Drive. You Lose."), but is aimed clearly at impaired driving: "Drunk Driving. Over the Limit. Under Arrest." What does the latest data show? Per usual, results are mixed. The number of fatalities in crashes involving an impaired driver declined 3.7% in 2007 to 12,998. But the number of total traffic fatalities dropped 3.9%. So the percentage of all fatalities deemed alcohol-impaired ticked up slightly to 31.7%. That percentage has changed…

Publishing Info

  • Year 2008
  • Volume 25
  • Issue # 9
While alcohol beverage consumption, and beer drinking in particular, are widely believed to expand weight and waist size, a new study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found no association between an increase in waist circumference and drinking alcohol. This study of 43,500 Danish middle age adults (age 50 to 64) found this held true for both moderate and frequent drinkers. Though "drinking frequency was not associated with major waist loss," it was "inversely associated with major waist gain among both men and women" over a 5-year follow up period. Researchers determined that the "odds for a major waist gain" was highest for those adults in the lightest or non-drinking categories. That meant: "The lowest odds ratios for major waist gain according to drinking frequency was observed among daily drinking women." Women who reported drinking up to 14 to 20 drinks per week were 19% less likely to see an increase in waist size. Surprisingly perhaps, the risk of waist size increase was lower for women consuming 28 or more drinks per week compared to those who drank less than 1 per week. For men, the greatest risk reduction for increased waist size was for those who consumed 21-28…

Publishing Info

  • Year 2008
  • Volume 25
  • Issue # 4