bmiheader

Subscribers-Archives Access

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

Public Archives Search

Keyword

STOCKS

Market quotes are powered by TradingView.com

Alcohol Issues Insights

Duplicating the results of a 2001 study from North Carolina, Canadian researchers used actual BAC data from college students in Ontario to suggest their colleagues in the US (and elsewhere) misuse the term

Publishing Info

  • Year 2004
  • Volume 21
  • Issue # 10
09/14/2004

RWJ and

Public health advocates are keeping the heat on alcohol issues this election season. The Robert Wood Johnson-funded "Join Together" advocacy group recently partnered with CSPI, The Marin Institute and others to produce a "guide " for all "state and federal candidates running for Congress, governor, state legislator and other statewide elected offices.""Ten Drug and Alcohol Policies that Will Save Lives" claims to provide "proven strategies

Publishing Info

  • Year 2004
  • Volume 21
  • Issue # 9
After three straight years when the number of traffic deaths deemed alcohol-related (when a driver or non-occupant has a measurable blood alcohol content) had increased, the number of alcohol-related traffic fatalities (ARF) declined by 511, 2.9% in 2003, according to federal government figures. That was the best trend since 1997, when the number declined by over 1,000, 5.8%. What

Publishing Info

  • Year 2004
  • Volume 21
  • Issue # 8
A significant new study by Danish scientists lends further weight to the emerging consensus that light-to-moderate drinking doesn

Publishing Info

  • Year 2004
  • Volume 21
  • Issue # 7
New estimates of the prevalence of alcohol abuse/ dependence in the US once again cast doubt on the simplistic belief that rates of alcohol problems are necessarily linked to rates of per capita consumption. Acting under that principle, many public health officials advocate "environmental measures" like higher taxes aimed at reducing overall consumption, rather than targeting efforts to reduce specific problem drinking. In fact, consumption and abuse rates moved in opposite directions from 1992 to 2002 in the US. Per capita consumption of absolute alcohol declined by about 4% during this period, from 1.76 gallons to 1.69 gallons, based on shipments of beer, wine and spirits. Yet, the just-released National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) found prevalence of alcohol abuse and dependence combined among US adults rose from 7.4% 1991-92 to 8.5% over the decade. An increase in the prevalence of abuse more than offset the slight drop in the rate of dependence. As a result of these prevalence rates, the number of adult Americans who abused alcohol or were alcohol-dependent (the more serious condition, sometimes called "alcoholism") rose by 3.8 million to 17.6 million in the decade, NIAAA estimates. That increase may reflect attitude changes more…

Publishing Info

  • Year 2004
  • Volume 21
  • Issue # 6
A pair of new studies using the same measure of self-reported well-being concluded that drinkers consistently report better health than abstainers. A US study of 5,669 adults found that "light to moderate consumption and more frequent drinking were associated with better general health and physical functioning for both" men and women. What

Publishing Info

  • Year 2004
  • Volume 21
  • Issue # 5
Page 10 of 11